News

Food Bank Responds to Blocking of Administration’s Public Charge Rule

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 11, 2019

New York, NY — Today, U.S. District Court Judge George Daniels issued a preliminary nationwide injunction stopping enforcement of the Trump administration’s proposed “Public Charge” rule, which was set to take effect on Tuesday. 

Margarette Purvis, President and CEO of Food Bank For New York City, issued the following statement in response:

“We applaud Attorney General Letitia James and all of New York’s leaders who championed the fight to protect vulnerable communities across the country and here in New York City. The threat of this rule alone has already intimidated too many of our neighbors and made them feel unsafe accessing the services for which they are eligible.  

“Fear has driven many families away from SNAP and other vital programs like WIC. We have met these New Yorkers at countless soup kitchens and food pantries across the city, which are already stretched for resources.

“The best solutions to hunger are just and humane policies. We are grateful to have connected leaders fighting for all New Yorkers.”

 

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About Food Bank For New York City

For 36 years, Food Bank For New York City has been the city’s major hunger-relief organization working to end hunger throughout the five boroughs. Nearly one in five New Yorkers relies on Food Bank for food and other resources. Food Bank takes a strategic, multifaceted approach that provides meals and builds capacity in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among all New Yorkers. Through its network of more than 1,000 charities and schools citywide, Food Bank provides food for more than 61 million free meals per year for New Yorkers in need. Food Bank For New York City’s income support services, including food stamps (also known as SNAP) and free tax assistance for the working poor, put more than $110 million each year into the pockets of New Yorkers, helping them to afford food and achieve greater dignity and independence. Food Bank’s nutrition education programs and services empower more than 50,000 children, teens and adults to sustain a healthy diet and active lifestyle on a limited budget. Working toward long-term solutions to food poverty, Food Bank develops policy and conducts research to inform community and government efforts. To learn more about how you can help, please visit foodbanknyc.org. Follow us on Facebook (FoodBank4NYC), Twitter (@FoodBank4NYC) and Instagram (FoodBank4NYC).

Contact: Jennifer Barden, Jennifer@risaheller.com, (646) 676-4486

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