Food Bank founded the award-winning SNAP Task Force to facilitate open collaboration between public and private anti-hunger organizations. The group’s purpose is to use a mediation model to understand and resolve SNAP application issues for NYC residents.

  • Meeting Materials
  • About SNAP Task Force
  • How It Works

Food Bank sets the agenda and provides the primary materials for each month’s meeting. Download the Calendar of upcoming NYC SNAP Task Force meetings and topics here. Find materials and agendas from prior meetings below:

Minutes, Agendas, and Research Packets

Please contact us for meeting materials prior to January 2017.

The SNAP* Task Force provides community organizations and SNAP advocates with a forum and platform primarily focused on changes and trends in SNAP administration in New York City. 

Food Bank For New York City has been a proud driving force of the New York City SNAP Task Force for more than 15 years. The mission of the Task Force is to improve access to SNAP benefits for low-income New Yorkers.

Chaired by Food Bank, the Task Force boasts a membership of more than 200 SNAP advocates, service providers, government representatives, and experts from New York City, New York State, and other parts of the country. Organizations with a national focus are also Task Force members.

The New York City SNAP Task Force received the 2015 Food Research and Action Center Award for Innovative Anti-Hunger Work.

For more information, contact Emanuel Negron,  Assoicate Director of Benefit Access at Food Bank For New York City.

*Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

The Task Force meets monthly to discuss how changes in SNAP administrative policy impact outreach, application assistance, and mediation. The work of the Task Force centers on:

  • disseminating the latest SNAP-related administrative policy,
  • analyzing mediation trends,
  • seeking out systemic barriers to SNAP participation, and
  • discussing these and other topics with partners from the Human Resources Administration (HRA), the Office of Temporary Disability Assistance (OTDA), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

 

Food Bank sets the agenda and provides the primary materials for each month’s meeting. These materials include the latest SNAP program and administrative changes, announcements, and related items; an analysis of citywide mediation activity and trends derived from reports by Mediation Model participants; and, each quarter, a Mediation Trends Report derived from Mediation Model reporting from our members over the preceding quarter.