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STATEMENT BY FOOD BANK FOR NEW YORK CITY PRESIDENT AND CEO LESLIE GORDON ON HER APPOINTMENT IN MAYOR-ELECT ERIC ADAM’S TRANSITION TEAM

New York (December 3, 2021) New York City’s Mayor-elect Eric Adams has identified more than 700 people who will serve on his mayoral transition committees, including Food Bank For New York City’s President & CEO, Leslie Gordon. Gordon will serve as a member of the Food Policy and Human Services committees.

Food Bank For New York City’s President and CEO Leslie Gordon said:

“I am honored to join Mayor-elect Adams’ Transition Team as we work together to fortify our City’s human service and food assistance opportunities within the next City Administration. The Mayor-elect has gathered an amazing group of thought leaders and advocates to share our collective experience and expertise. At a time when we food assistance providers have more than doubled our distribution, yet food insecurity continues to threaten New Yorkers in need, our City must take every opportunity to prevent hunger and its root causes. Mayor-elect Adams has prioritized community health and nutrition throughout his public service, and I look forward to working with him and my colleagues on the Food Policy and Human Services committees within the Team to support the vision for a New York where all have access to the food and resources they need to fuel our great City.” 

 

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ABOUT FOOD BANK FOR NEW YORK CITY

Since 1983, Food Bank For New York City has been the city’s major hunger-relief organization working to end hunger throughout the five boroughs. Nearly one in five New Yorkers relies on Food Bank for food and other resources. Food Bank takes a strategic, multifaceted approach that provides meals and builds capacity in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among all New Yorkers. Through its network of more than 1,000 charities and schools citywide, Food Bank provided more than 80 million free meals last year for New Yorkers in need. Food Bank For New York City’s income support services, including food stamps (also known as SNAP) and free tax assistance for the working poor, put nearly $36 million each year into the pockets of New Yorkers, helping them to afford food and achieve greater dignity and independence. Food Bank’s nutrition education programs and services empower more than 50,000 children, teens and adults to sustain a healthy diet and active lifestyle on a limited budget. Working toward long-term solutions to food poverty, Food Bank develops policy and conducts research to inform community and government efforts. To learn more about how you can help, please visit foodbanknyc.org. Follow us on Facebook (FoodBank4NYC), Twitter (@FoodBank4NYC) and Instagram (@FoodBank4NYC).

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