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NYC Hunger Experience 2008 Fact Sheet


The NYC Hunger Experience Report series tracks annual trends in difficulty affording food among New York City residents. Food Bank For New York City contracts with Marist College Institute for Public Opinion to conduct telephone interviews with a random and representative sample of city residents. Socio-demographic findings identify which populations throughout the five boroughs are having the greatest difficulty affording food throughout the year in order to inform policy solutions and address the problem of food poverty. NYC Hunger Experience 2008 includes five years of trend analysis, from 2003 (the earliest year the poll was conducted) through 2007.


NYC RESIDENTS

Difficulty affording food: The number of NYC residents who experienced difficulty affording needed food throughout the year steadily increased every year, from 2 million in 2003 to 3.1 million in 2007 — a 55 percent increase.

Impact of loss of income: The number of NYC residents who would not be able to afford needed food immediately after the loss of their household income increased from approximately 1.3 million in 2003 to approximately 1.6 million in 2007 — a 23 percent increase.


HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Difficulty affording food: The largest percentage increase in NYC residents experiencing difficulty affording needed food was among middle-income residents. From 2003 to 2007, the percentage of NYC residents experiencing difficulty:

  • doubled (from 21 percent to 42 percent) among residents with annual household incomes between $25,000 and $49,999,
  • almost doubled (from 14 percent to 27 percent) among residents with annual household incomes between $50,000 and $74,999 and
  • increased by more than five times (from 4 percent to 21 percent) among residents with annual household incomes of $75,000 and higher.

Impact of loss of income: The largest percentage increase in NYC residents immediately unable to afford food after the loss of their household income was among middle-income residents. Among NYC residents with annual household incomes between $25,000 and $49,999, the percentage unable to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income increased by 63 percent, from 16 percent in 2003 to 26 percent in 2007.


EMPLOYMENT[1]

Difficulty affording food: More than one-third (35 percent) of NYC households with at least one employed member experienced difficulty affording needed food in 2007.

Impact of loss of income: Approximately one out of every five (19 percent) NYC households with at least one employed member would not be able to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income.


EDUCATION

Difficulty affording food: The greatest percent increase in difficulty affording needed food was among NYC residents with a college degree, tripling from 11 percent in 2003 to more than one-third (35 percent) in 2007.

Impact of loss of income: The greatest percent increase in NYC residents who would be unable to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income was among residents without a college degree. From 2003 to 2007, the percentage of NYC residents immediately unable to afford food after losing their household income:

  • increased by 24 percent (from 21 percent to 26 percent) among residents with a high school education or less and
  • increased by 37 percent (from 19 percent to 26 percent) among residents with some college or an Associate's Degree.


AGE

Difficulty affording food: Almost one-half of NYC residents ages 36 to 64 experienced difficulty affording needed food in 2007 — the highest percentage among all age categories. From 2003 to 2007, the percentage of NYC residents experiencing difficulty:

  • increased 67 percent (from 27 percent to 45 percent respectively) among residents age 36 to 49 and
  • increased 76 percent (from 25 percent to 44 percent respectively) among residents age 50 to 64.

Impact of loss of income: NYC residents ages 36 to 64 were among the age category with the highest percentage immediately unable to afford food after the loss of their household income. From 2003 to 2007, the percentage of NYC residents immediately unable to afford food after losing their household income:

  • increased by 50 percent (from 16 percent to 24 percent respectively) among residents ages 36 to 49 and
  • increased by 50 percent (from 14 percent to 21 percent respectively) among residents ages 50 to 64.

The percentage of NYC residents ages 65 or older who would be unable to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income increased 55 percent, from 11 percent in 2005 to 17 percent in 2007.


HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN

Difficulty affording food: Almost one-half (45 percent) of households with children in New York City had difficulty affording needed food in 2007, up from approximately one-third (32 percent) in 2003 — a 41 percent increase.

Impact of loss of income: In 2007, more than one out of every five (22 percent) NYC households with children would not be able to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income, up from 20 percent in 2003.


GENDER

Difficulty affording food: In 2007, a higher percentage of women in NYC had difficulty affording needed food than men — 42 percent and 35 percent, respectively.

Impact of loss of income: In 2007, a higher percentage of women than men in NYC would not be able to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income — 24 percent and 16 percent, respectively.


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[1] The question on household employment was new in 2007 and trend analysis is not available.

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