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NYC Hunger Experience 2006 Highlights


NYC Residents Food Bank crown_small black Household Income Food Bank crown_small black Age Category

Households with Children Food Bank crown_small black Race/Ethnicity Food Bank crown_small black Education Level

Gender Food Bank crown_small black Borough Analysis


NYC Residents

  • Since 2003, the number of NYC residents who experienced difficulty affording needed food in the past year steadily increased from approximately two million residents in 2003 to 2.5 million in 2004, 2.6 million in 2005, and finally to almost three million in 2006.
  • The number of residents who would not be able to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income increased by 24 percent, from approximately 1.3 million in 2003 to approximately 1.7 million in 2006.

Household Income

  • Residents with annual household incomes of less than $25,000 had the most difficulty affording food, with 61 percent having difficulty in 2006 — an increase from 49 percent in 2003.
  • For households with annual incomes between $25,000 and $49,999, the percent with difficulty rose from one-fifth (21 percent) in 2003 to 39 percent in 2006, an increase of 86 percent.
  • For households with incomes between $50,000 and $74,999, the percent experiencing difficulty doubled from 14 percent in 2003 to 28 percent in 2006.
  • Since 2003, the number of residents in the middle-income categories that would not be able to afford food immediately after the loss of their household income increased — from 16 percent in 2003 to more than one-quarter (26 percent) in 2006 among households with incomes between $25,000 and $49,999, and an increase from 10 percent in 2003 to 16 percent in 2006 among households with incomes between $50,000 and $74,999.

Age Category

  • The age category experiencing the most difficulty affording needed food was among residents ages 50 to 64. While in 2003, one-quarter (25 percent) of residents 50 to 64 experienced difficulty affording needed food, this figure increased to 42 percent in 2006.
  • The greatest increases in residents who would have difficulty affording food immediately after the loss of a household income were seen among residents ages 36 to 49 — from 16 percent in 2003 to more than one-quarter (26 percent) in 2006 — and among residents ages 50 to 64 — from 14 percent to more than one-fifth (22 percent).

Households with Children

  • In 2006, 44 percent of households with children experienced difficulty affording needed food, an increase from almost one-third (32 percent) in 2003.
  • Since 2003, the number of households with children that would be immediately unable to access needed food after the loss of household income increased from 20 percent to 27 percent in 2006.

Race/Ethnicity

  • Difficulty affording needed food in 2006 was highest among African-American residents, with more than one-half (56 percent) not being able to afford needed food, an increase of 75 percent since 2003.
  • Among White residents, the number experiencing difficulty affording needed food increased from 13 percent in 2003 to 22 percent in 2006.
  • Among Latino/Hispanic residents, the number experiencing difficulty affording needed food remained practically the same between 2003 (47 percent) and 2006 (46 percent).

Education Level

  • While more than one-half (51 percent) of residents with a high school education or less experienced difficulty affording needed food, the greatest change was seen among residents with some college or an Associate's Degree, from slightly more than one-fifth (22 percent) in 2003 to 43 percent in 2006.
  • In 2006, one-quarter (25 percent) of residents with a high school degree or less and residents with some college or an Associate's Degree would not be able to afford food immediately after the loss of a household income. This finding represents a change from previous years when the percentage of residents with a high school degree or less who would not be able to afford food was higher than all other education categories.

Gender

  • Findings show that in 2006 women continued to have more difficulty affording food than men, 40 percent in contrast to 32 percent, respectively.
  • A higher percent of women than men reported that they would not able to afford food immediately after the loss of a household income for all years since 2003. While ability to afford food immediately after the loss of a household income among men remained about the same for all years since 2003 (15 percent in 2003, 13 percent in 2004, 17 percent in 2005 and 16 percent in 2006), women experienced an increase from one-fifth (20 percent) to more than one-quarter (26 percent).

Borough Analysis

  • The Bronx and Brooklyn were the boroughs with the highest percentage of residents having difficulty affording food (42 percent among both boroughs).
  • In Brooklyn, the number experiencing difficulty affording needed food in 2006 increased by 75 percent since 2003, the highest increase among the boroughs.
  • More than one-third (35 percent) of Queens residents had difficulty affording food in 2006, an increase of more than one-half (52 percent) since 2003.
  • Nearly one-third (32 percent) of Manhattan residents had difficulty affording food in 2006, an increase of 45 percent since 2003.
  • More than one-fifth (22 percent) of Staten Island residents had difficulty affording food in 2006, an increase of 22 percent since 2003.

NYC Residents Food Bank crown_small black Household Income Food Bank crown_small black Age Category Food Bank crown_small black Households with Children

Race/Ethnicity Food Bank crown_small black Education Level Food Bank crown_small black Gender Food Bank crown_small black Borough Analysis


Full Report Food Bank crown_small black Summary

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